Why to use business storytelling?

09 Dec Why to use business storytelling?

Why tell stories?

Storytelling is human.

It is deeply rooted in human nature and as old as mankind itself.

A need to tell and hear stories is essential to the species Homo sapiens – second in necessity apparently after nourishment and before love and shelter. Millions survive without love or home, almost none in silence.

Every culture has started with an oral tradition that precedes the written account of events and traditions. Even today we can find indigenous people who strongly rely on stories to pass on important aspects of their culture.

For example, if we look at the Australian aboriginals we find songs about rites of passage, fertility and death. The leaders of these rituals have great prestige in his or her community which comes through control of knowledge and the forms in which knowledge is encoded.

Those stories are a kind of commodity for the Aboriginals. They travelled great distances to other communities to learn new stories, for which they almost certainly paid in various trade goods.

Humans are storytelling organisms that both individually and socially, lead storied lives. So to answer the question ‘why tell stories’, it would be very strange and even unnatural to not tell stories.

Stories about what?

Myths, epics and fairytales were passed on by storytelling for generations. A story helps to remember things. It encourages feelings of belonging.

We tells stories about the groups we belong to: our religion, our country, our families, the sport teams or music bands we are fans of. We also have stories about ourselves, about who we are and what we believe in. Narrative helps us to make sense of our selves. One way we understand ourselves is by narrating ourselves, telling ourselves stories in which we figure as prominent characters.

But narrative is not the work of poets, dramatists and novelists reflecting upon events which had no narrative order before one was imposed by an artist; narrative form is neither disguise nor decoration. Stories are lived before they are told.

Why tell stories?

Storytelling is human.

It is deeply rooted in human nature and as old as mankind itself.

A need to tell and hear stories is essential to the species Homo sapiens – second in necessity apparently after nourishment and before love and shelter. Millions survive without love or home, almost none in silence.

Every culture has started with an oral tradition that precedes the written account of events and traditions. Even today we can find indigenous people who strongly rely on stories to pass on important aspects of their culture.

For example, if we look at the Australian aboriginals we find songs about rites of passage, fertility and death. The leaders of these rituals have great prestige in his or her community which comes through control of knowledge and the forms in which knowledge is encoded.

Those stories are a kind of commodity for the Aboriginals. They travelled great distances to other communities to learn new stories, for which they almost certainly paid in various trade goods.

Humans are storytelling organisms that both individually and socially, lead storied lives. So to answer the question ‘why tell stories’, it would be very strange and even unnatural to not tell stories.

Stories about what?

Myths, epics and fairytales were passed on by storytelling for generations. A story helps to remember things. It encourages feelings of belonging.

We tells stories about the groups we belong to: our religion, our country, our families, the sport teams or music bands we are fans of. We also have stories about ourselves, about who we are and what we believe in. Narrative helps us to make sense of our selves. One way we understand ourselves is by narrating ourselves, telling ourselves stories in which we figure as prominent characters.

But narrative is not the work of poets, dramatists and novelists reflecting upon events which had no narrative order before one was imposed by an artist; narrative form is neither disguise nor decoration. Stories are lived before they are told.

Author:Wouter Trappers
http://www.deloitte.com As a technology transformation consultant at Deloitte, Wouter helps organizations to become insight driven. He is specialized in implementing user-friendly management dashboards that are focused on creating business value. Wouter holds a master’s degree in Philosophy. In his free time he can be found in the Crossfit box in Ghent or working on one of his many hobby projects – tech or non-tech alike.

No Comments

Post A Comment